Information for Authors

Manuscript Structure

1. The title should give a terse description of the content, to help someone carefully scanning a journal contents page decide whether to read the abstract or the paper itself. Do not use complicated mathematics and abbreviations in the title.

2. The list of authors by initials and surname, without space between the initials of an author's name, and without space between the initials and the surname. The authors are listed alphabetically.

3. The list of affiliations and addresses of the authors.

4. The article should be preceded by a short abstract containing not more than 100 words in which the author(s) should formulate the aim of the study and describe the results obtained. The purpose of the abstract is to summarize the contents of the paper. It should do so in enough detail to enable the reader to decide whether to read the whole paper. The reader should not have to refer to the paper to understand the abstract. Do not cite references by number in the abstract, since the list of references will not usually accompany the abstract in the review journals.

Do not use complicated mathematics in abstract.

5. Unless the paper is very short it is advisable to use the relevant subheadings, e.g.: Introduction. Theoretical. Procedure. Experimental. Results and Discussion. Conclusion. References. The "Introduction" should state the purpose of the investigation with imperative references to relevant previous works. If there is the "Conclusions" section (and not every paper needs one) it should not simply repeat earlier sections in the same words. You should number only those equations that are referenced within the text. All abbreviations and other notations should be defined the first time they are used and should be uniform throughout the manuscript.

6. Short communications may not contain subheadings.

7. Appendix should appear before the References section, not after.

8. References.

References

The references to the literature in the text should be given in the citation order as Arabian numerals in square brackets.  If cited directly, the author's name should be referred to without brackets, followed by the reference number in brackets. In direct citation, if there are more then two authors, the name of the first author should be given, followed by et al. Et al. is not used in list of references unless it appears in the original work. At the first mention of person's name, it is acceptable to use the person's initials and the last name. All subsequent references should use only the person's last name unless the initials are needed to distinguish between two people with the same last name.

1.      Books:

1. Author's Name (see formulations of authors' name below). Title of Chapter (optional). Title of Book. Editor(s). City: Publisher, year of publication, volume, edition (if not first), chapter.

2. Daniel J.W. The Approximate Minimization of Functionals. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1971.

3. Wright S. Variability within and among Natural Populations. Vol. 4 of Evolution and the Genetics of Populations. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1978.

2.      Article from a Collection of Articles:

1. Author's Name. Article Name. In: Title of Book. Editor(s). City: Publisher, year of publication, volume, pages.

2. Poljak B.T. Sharp Minimum. In: Generalized Lagrangians and Applications. Proc. IIASA Workshop. Ed. A.Wierzbicki. Oxford: Prgamon Press, 1982.

3.      Articles in Journals:

1. Author's Name. Title of Paper. Title of Journal, year of publication, volume number, issue number, page number(s).

2. Kalman R.E. Contributions to the Theory of Optimal Control. Boletin de la Sociedad Matematica Mexicana, 1960, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 102119.

3. Shannon C. The Bandwagon. IRE, IT-2, 1956, no. 1, p. 3.

4.      Meeting Paper:

1. Author's Name. Title of Paper (if no title, use Abstracts of Papers in Roman type). Name of Meeting or Conference. City: Publisher, year, volume number, issue number, page number(s).

2. Okada J. Thermal Expansion of Pitch-Bended Carbons. 4th Conference on Carbon. New York: Pergamon, 1960, pp. 547552.

3. Reid J.G. Computation of Optimal Inputs for Parameter Identification with Walsh and Other Orthogonal Basis Functions. Joint Autom. Control Conf., West Lafayette, 1976, pp. 495-500.

4. Ewen J.A. Abstracts of Papers, Int. Symp. on Future Aspects of Olefin Polymerization, Tokyo, 1985, p. 271.

5.      Preprinrs, Reports:

1. Author's Name. Title of Paper. Preprint (Report) of Name of Institution. City, year, number, page(s).

2. Logic, Synthesis and Optimization Benchmarks. Report. University of California. Berkley, 1988, no. NC 27709.

3. Brown B., Cochan S., Dalkey N., The Delphi Method II: Structure of Experiments. Memorandum. The Rand Corporation. Santa Monica, California, 1969, RM-5957-PR.

4. Kononov D.A., Kul'ba V.V., Kavalevskii, S.S., and Kosyachenko, S.A. Sythesis of Formalized Scenarios and Structural Stability of Complex Systems (Synergetics and Attractive Behavior), Preprint of Inst. of Control Sciences, Russ. Acad. Sci. Moscow, 1998.

6.      Deposotions:

1. Author's Name. Title of Paper. Available from  . City, year, number, page(s).

2. Zhusubaliev Zh.T., Sukhoterin E.A., and Rudakov V.N. On Bifurcations and Chaotic Oscillations in the Relay Systems of Automatic Control with Hysteresis. Available from VINITI. Moscow, 1999, no. 2698-B99.

7.      Dissertations:

1. Author's Name. Title of Dissertation. Cand. Sc./Doctoral (Faculty) Dissertation, City, Institution, year.

8.      Patents:

1. Muzychenko O.N., The Device for Modulo-Seven Multiplication. USSR Inventor's Certificate no. 1647560. Byull. Izobret., 1991, no. 17, p. 181.

2. Jordan O.D. UK Patent 2081298, 1982.

3. Teidzin K.K. Jpn Laid-out Appl., 61-207616, 1986.

4. Lyle F.R. US Patent 5973257, Chem. Abstr., 1985, vol. 65, p. 2870.

Remarks 

1.      Et al. is not used in list of references unless it appears in the original work.

2.      When no facts of publication are available for a book, n.p., n.d. (no place, no date) may be used to indicate that neither could be found, or you may omit the corresponding position.

3.      For titles in English, including titles of books, journals, articles, chapters, and dissertations and names of conferences, use title capitalization. Always capitalize the first word in the title and subtitle, and capitalize all other words except for articles, prepositions, and conjunctions. For titles given in a foreign language, follow the rules of capitalization for that language. In French titles, only the first word and proper nouns are capitalized; in German titles, the first word and all nouns are capitalized.

4.      Take care to respect letters and accented characters from other languages. Examples: À, Ä, Å, ¢, à, ê, ç, ß, etc. 

5.      Authors sometimes confuse the use of various type of dashes. Hyphens (-,-) are used for some compound words (many such words should have no hyphen but must be run together, like "nonzero," or split apart, like "well defined"). Minus sighs ($-$) should be used in math to represent subtraction or negative numbers. En dashes (--) are used for ranges (like 3--5, June--August), or for joined names (like Runge--Kutta). Em dashes (---) are used to set off a clause---such as this one---from the rest of the sentence.

 

Instruction for Preparing an Electronic Version of the Paper 

Authors of accepted papers are encouraged to submit their LaTeX 2ε files to the Executive Editor-in-Chief for typesetting. The journal cannot accept electronic files for paper produced on any other typesetting or word processing system.

The authors can download the main macro package iitpinfo.cls from this page. Do not modify this file

All illustration must be of professional quality and prepared as Portable Network Graphics figures, and in this case you must include command \usepackage{graphicx} before the \begin{document} command. All Portable Network Graphics figures should be sent in separate PNG files.

For the final version of the journal we use ttftimes package, if you have no this package it is possible to use any standard free TeX fonts but the final version of your article will be a little different after processing with the ttftimes package. You need no to include amsfonts package by the command \usepackage{amsfonts} because our macro package already have it.  Additional file newcom.tex must contain the descriptions of all non-standard LaTeX command used by the author(s). In this case you must include the command \input with the name of the file newcom.tex before the \begin{document} command or in the body of your article file.

The author(s) should prepare the article as the title.tex file, where it is possible to use any name instead of title (e.g., name of the author). This file should necessarily contain the following commands:

 

\documentclass[english,ams,yap]{iitpinfo}

(it is possible to use any cyrillic (Russian) characters with the following command {\Russian cyrillic text}) 

 

\usepackage{hyperref}

\usepackage{ttftimes}

(you can omit this command if you have no ttftimes package)

 

\begin{document}

\VolumeNo{1}

\IssueNo{1}

\YearOfIssue{2001}

\setcounter{page}{1}

\CopyrightYear{2001}

(exact entries in the figure brackets of the last five command will be inserted by the Editorial Board).

 

Each article should contain also the following obligatory commands:

\title{First Line of the Title \\ Second Line of the Title\thanks{This work was supported by the ..., project no. 11111.}}

(you can use the command  \\ if the title of the article have more then one line, and the command \thanks{text} if the author(s) have received a support from any Foundations or Institutions);

\author{A.A.Ivanov\inst{1}, B.B.Petroff\inst{1}, J.Smith\inst{2}}

(the authors should use the commands \inst{1}, \inst{2}, etc., only in the case, when there is more than one affiliation and address);

\institute{First affiliation and address\and Second affiliation and address}

(you should use command(s) \and only in the case, when there is more than one affiliation and address);

\received{Received October 10, 2001}

(exact entry in the figure brackets will be inserted by the Editorial Board);

\titlerunning{A Short Running Title, not more then 50 cHaracters}

\authorrunning{IVANOV, PETROFF, SMITH}

(initial(s) should be used in this command only if more then one author have the same name)

\CopyrightedAuthors{Ivanov, Petroff, Smith}

(initial(s) should be used in this command only if more then one author have the same name)

\Rubric{journal subheading}

(exact entry in the figure brackets will be inserted by the Editorial Board);

\maketitle

\begin{abstract}

Abstract text. 

\end{abstract}

\section{Section heading}

\subsection{Subsection Heading}

\appendix

(use this command if you need APPENDIX section in the article);

\footnote[3]{Footnote number 3 text.}

(note that footnote marks begin with number 2 if there is \thanks command in the article);

\begin{thebibliography}{9}

(this is the first command in the REFERENCES section; entry in the figure brackets coincides with the number of bibliographic references);

\bibitem {kalm1} {Kalman R.E. Contributions to the Theory of Optimal Control. {\it Boletin de la Sociedad Matematica Mexicana}, 1960, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 102--119.}

\end{thebibliography}

(this is the last command in the REFERENCES section);

\revredEng{N.A.Kuznetsov}

(exact name in the figure brackets will be inserted by the Editorial Board).

\end{document}

This is the last command in the body of article.

Some additional commands:

A. Illustration:

\begin{figure}[t]
         \centering\includegraphics[height=57mm,width=67mm,clip]{fig-1.png}
         \begin{center}
         {\small
Fig. 1. Caption text}
         \end{center}
         \end{figure}

B. Theorems, Definitions, etc.:

1) theorem with the number

\begin{theorem}

Text.

\end{theorem}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Theorem in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with theorem within number this section) if there is stheorem argument in the figure brackets;

2) theorem without the number

\begin{theorem*}

Text.

\end{theorem*}

3) lemma with the number

\begin{lemma}

Text.

\end{lemma}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Lemma in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with lemma number within this section) if there is slemma argument in the figure brackets;

4) lemma without the number

\begin{lemma*}

Text.

\end{lemma*}

5) corollary with the number

\begin{corollary}

Text.

\end{corollary}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Corollary in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with corollary number within this section) if there is scorollary argument in the figure brackets;

6) corollary without the number

\begin{corollary*}

Text.

\end{corollary*}

7) definition with the number

\begin{definition}

Text.

\end{definition}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Definition in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with definition number within this section) if there is sdefinition argument in the figure brackets;

8) definition without the number

\begin{definition*}

Text.

\end{definition*}

9) remark with the number

\begin{remark}

Text.

\end{remark}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Remark in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with remark number within this section) if there is sremark argument in the figure brackets;

10) remark without the number

\begin{remark*}

Text.

\end{remark*}

11) proposition with the number

\begin{proposition}

Text.

\end{proposition}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Proposition in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is sproposition argument in the figure brackets;

12) proposition without the number

\begin{proposition*}

Text.

\end{proposition*}

13) assumption with the number

\begin{assumption}

Text.

\end{assumption}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Assumption in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is sassumption argument in the figure brackets;

14) assumption without the number

\begin{assumption*}

Text.

\end{assumption*}

15) assertion with the number

\begin{assertion}

Text.

\end{assertion}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Assertion in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is sassertion argument in the figure brackets;

16) assertion without the number

\begin{assertion*}

Text.

\end{assertion*}

17) example with the number

\begin{example}

Text.

\end{example}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Example in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is sexample argument in the figure brackets;

18) example without the number

\begin{example*}

Text.

\end{example*}

19) solution with the number

\begin{solution}

Text.

\end{solution}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Solution in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is ssolution argument in the figure brackets;

20) solution without the number

\begin{solution*}

Text.

\end{solution*}

21 ) proof

\begin{proof}

Text.

\end{proof}

(this command is non obligatory);

22) case

\begin{case}

Text.

\end{case}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Case construction in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is scase argument in the figure brackets;

23) stage

\begin{stage}

Text.

\end{stage}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Stage construction in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is sstage argument in the figure brackets;

24) step

\begin{step}

Text.

\end{step}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Step construction in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is sstep argument in the figure brackets;

25) algorithm

\begin{algorithm}

Text.

\end{algorithm}

(this command should be used if there are more then one Algorithm in the article with proper automatic numbering);

there will be double numbering (section number with proposition number within this section) if there is salgorithm argument in the figure brackets.

C. Equations:

One advantage of LaTeX is that it can automatically number equations and refer to these equation number in text. You should number only those equations that are referenced within the text. All equations should be centered, and equation number would be placed at the right.

It is possible to use double numbering (section number with equation number within this section). In this case you need to encert the following command

\numberwithin{equation}{section}

after the \maketitle command at the beginning of the file. 

When a displayed formula is too long to fit on one line it should be broken before a binary operation. A formula in the text should be broken after a relation symbol or binary operation, not after.

D. Tables

In LaTeX 2ε, tables are most conveniently constructed with the tabular or array environments, although in some cases the tabbing environment might prove useful.

It is easier to compare like quantities if they are arranged in columns rather than rows. Only essential information should be included in a table. To maximize readability of table design should be as simple as possible. In particular, it is best to minimize the number of rules in the table. Give a clear reference to the table at an appropriate place in the text. 

Every table should be given a number and should be cited in the text by that number, either directly or parenthetically. Tables are numbered in the order in which they are to appear in the text. The table number and table heading (e.g., Table 2. Table heading) should be placed on a line flush left. The heading should identify the table briefly.

If there is only one table in an article, it should not be numbered. If such a table is referred to parenthetically, no additional words are needed. For example, write (see table) or (table). If the table does not have a heading, Table (capitalized and in bold roman type) should be used in place of the heading. Otherwise, the heading should be used without Table.

A very long table can be continued on successive pages. Continued lines are used as needed, the one at the foot of a page reading (optional), e.g.,

Continued on next page

and the one at the top of the next page (obligatory)

Table 2---Continued 

Attention should be given to the horizontal and vertical alignment of the information in the column.

The footnotes to a table are typed below the body of table and justified. A series of asterisk symbol may be used as references marks, and the first mark should be single asterisk *. Footnotes are normally set one size smaller then the body of a table.